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When it comes to improving road safety, most of us think about car and motorcycle safety rules, but what about trucks?

According to official data, people have been impacted by deadly large truck accidents more often than ever. In 2013, 3,964 people died in large truck accidents and truck drivers are not the only victims. Pedestrians and other occupants have also been impacted. According to experts, this number represents a 17 percent increase since 2009.

Safety experts believe that regulators have been ignoring the trucking issue. According to them, regulators have not acted on any of the more than 100 recommendations put forth by safety advocacy groups and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. Failure to act has been exposing truck drivers and others to major risks, increasing the risk of accidents.

Experts believe that pushing the implementation of safety technologies should not only be in the hands of regulators. They are also pushing truck manufacturers to develop car technologies that will prevent accidents and keep occupants safe if an accident does occur. While auto safety technology has been expanding in the auto industry, truck manufacturers continue to fail to develop similar safety features. Priorities, experts say, should change in 2015 so that fewer lives are taken in deadly truck accidents but manufacturers cannot do all the work alone.

According to some of the reports, the NTSB believes that regulators should enhance safety and work with companies by bettering limits on regulations involving driver hours. The transportation safety board is also pressing regulators to tighten regulations so that trucking companies with higher rates of truck accidents are required to improve their own standards.

One of the technologies that could be implemented to help boost trucking safety is the use of sensors, which could alert drivers whenever they are close to striking others from behind. the same sensors could help to alert truck drivers whenever vehicles change lanes as well.

Experts claim that, too often, drivers are simply succumbing to fatigue. Drowsy driving has been responsible for several personal injury and deadly truck accidents. Trucking companies should tackle the issue, the safety board recommended, and regulators should make sure they are implementing plans that better manage fatigue. Experts claim that screening drivers for sleep disorders should also help to prevent accidents.

Hopefully, regulators and trucking companies are able to work together to find a better way to manage safety technologies, implement better standards, and make sure that drivers are rested when they sit behind the wheel.

For more on this story and on what truck safety experts want regulators to do on the subject, follow this link.

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