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Summer is a couple of months away but Californians are already feeling the heat wave approaching.

Each year, Americans everywhere share true life stories involving children who are unfortunately left unattended inside hot vehicles during the summer or spring time. The stories are often sprinkled with frustration and pain stemming from parents who, too often, act out of lack of sleep or a busy schedule.

The latest story involving a parent who left a child in a vehicle comes from Oregon. According to the reports, the outside temperature that day hovered around 70 but that was not cool enough to keep the child from suffering deadly injuries. The girl’s 38-year-old dad left the child in the car for six hours.

The report shows that the baby was left inside of the car at an Intel parking lot. According to a medical examiner, the child died within the first hour. In spite of the autopsy’s inconclusive results, she may have died from positional asphyxia. Meaning that she may have not been able to breath due to her up-right position. Whether heat had nothing to do with it, the inside temperature of the car became hot quickly after the car was turned off.

Experts Urge Parents To Put Safety First

Leaving babies sleeping in a car safety seat for long periods of time is bad, but leaving young children in cars for long periods of time while unattended can be deadly. Too often, children either die of heat-related problems or breathing problems.

Safety organizations nationwide are using this tragic story to urge parents to never ignore the risks in the future. While their children may not die because of the temperature, other risks may loom. Ignoring these risks can put the lives of countless children in danger.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infants are vulnerable to certain issues related to sleeping positions. If parents are unaware of what to do to avoid leaving their children unattended in hot cars, they should make sure to listen to safety advocates like Safe Kids or other government-related organizations that work on making sure children are safe. Many safety advocates urge parents to make sure they place important objects such as a briefcase or cell phone in the back seat so they remember their child is their car safety seat.

If you would like to learn more on the Oregon story, follow this link.

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